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Displaying Monthly Archives: June 2015

singapore athletic association
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Colin-Tung-Zhi-Shing-DP

Name: Colin Tung Zhi Shing

Height: 1.75m

Weight: 63kg

Date of Birth: 19 November 1988 (27yrs)

Personal Best(s): 10:00.29min (Men 3000m steeplechase, 2015 Taiwan Open)

Career Highlight(s):
2014 Incheon Songdo International Half Marathon – 1 hour 14 minutes 52 seconds, 12th

2014 Straits Times Run at the Hub (Half Marathon) – 1 hour 15 minutes 42 seconds, 4th (Men’s Open)

2014 Army Half Marathon – 1 hour 17 minutes 7 seconds, 1st (Singapore Men’s category)

2014 National Under-23 and Open Track and Field Championships, 3,000m steeplechase, Men’s Open – 1st

2014 Singapore National Games Stadium Run (4.25km) – 3rd

2013 Community Games (4.3km) – 2nd (Men’s Open)

2012 Singapore Open Track and Field Championships, 3,000m steeplechase – 10 minutes 3.40 seconds, 1st

2012 Singapore National Games Road Run – 1st (Men’s Open)

2012 Singapore University Games Road Run – 3rd (men’s individual)

2012 Standard Chartered Marathon Singapore – 4th (Singapore Men’s)

2012 ASEAN University Games, 3,000m steeplechase – 9th

2012 ASEAN University Games, 10,000m – 8th

2011 Singapore University Games Cross Country Championships – 2nd (men’s individual)

2011 ASEAN Army International Run (22km), Men’s Invitational – 9th

2009 Army Half Marathon (men’s closed category) – 4th

2006 National Junior Track and Field Championships, Under-20 boys’ 3,000m steeplechase – 10 minutes 35.64 seconds, 3rd

2006 National Junior Track and Field Championships, Under-20 boys’ 1,500m – 4 minutes 25.66 seconds, 3rd

2006 National Inter-School Track and Field Championships, ‘A’ Division boys’ 800m – 2 minutes 2.08 seconds, 3rd

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

I’m targeting to finally go sub-10 minutes in the 3,000m steeplechase. With a 10 minutes 0.29 seconds personal best (PB) set at the recent Taiwan Open, I know I’m close and I want to break it convincingly. I also dream of a full stadium to achieve my target in, and to give friends and family a performance to remember. Also, if younger athletes out there feel inspired to do the 3,000m steeplechase themselves from watching me run, that’ll be a huge honour.

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

I guess I could say my preparations have been going well since I just clocked a PB in my event last week. But, as an athlete, it’s hard to be satisfied and I’m targeting a bigger PB knowing that getting that sub-10 is a matter of increasing my speed endurance and sharpening my focus for the couple of laps after the halfway mark in the 3,000m steeplechase when the going gets tough and I am still some way away from the finish. I am training alone during my interval sessions in this last month to hone my ability to run alone when the effort gets hard because it is likely I will have to do that in the race. Intensity of my track intervals are also at a high now before I taper in the last week or two.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

Early in my athletics journey, as a 15-year-old, I was left to fend for myself in track and field after the contract PE teacher who headed and coached the track and field team ended his tenure and left the school. With track and field not an official co-curricular activity, I had to find my own way to continue in the sport. I talked to the various PE teachers and one of them put me in contact with a coach she knew. I started training with that coach and, fortunately for me, she was a coach who was genuinely interested in my development as an athlete and a person. I would meet her once a week for training sessions watched by her. The rest of the week, however, I would train on my own, and that was a period of time that taught me how to be comfortable training on my own and pushing myself without external stimulus. It was a good foundation for the runner that I am today because, after all, running is very much a solitary activity and developing intrinsic motivation is essential to success as a runner.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

I started running the 3,000m steeplechase when I was in Anglo-Chinese Junior College. I found it a novel event, different from the flat running I usually did as a distance runner (I was doing mainly cross country, and the 800m and 1,500m on the track then). I remember signing up for the event at the National Juniors Track and Field Championships because it was scheduled for after the National Schools Cross Country Championships. My pet events then, the 800m and 1,500m, were scheduled for before National Schools Cross Country, which I was focussing on. I found jumping over barriers and the water jump refreshingly fun and it helped that I finished third in the ‘A’ Division at National Juniors so I had good memories of it.

In university, I still saw myself as a 800m and 1,500m runner so I didn’t focus on it though I competed in the event at the Institute-Varsity-Polytechnic (IVP) Championships. I started focusing on it when I realised I had a good chance of qualifying for the 2012 ASEAN University Games (AUG) in the event. I managed to do so with a 10:03 timing that year and it was a timing that wasn’t usually seen in Singapore in the several years before that. So I thought why not pursue this event since it is something I am one of the best in. That period was also a renaissance of sorts for the 3,000m steeplechase with a trio — T Haarishankar, Karthic Harish Ragupathy, and Feroz — of other guys clocking times in the region of what I was doing.

The attraction of the event is the barriers. It is what sets apart the 3,000m steeplechase from the other distance events. It is also what makes the event intimidating and scary simultaneously. Just as British mountaineer, the late George Mallory, when asked in 1923 why he kept up his repeated attempts to summit Mount Everest, said, “Because it is there.” The barriers, like Everest in some way, are there to be challenged, and can similarly humble the individual if approached complacently.

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

For most of the last year training for the SEA Games, I have been self-coached. For several years before too. For the last few months, I have also been seeking the advice of coach Elangovan. I would join his training group for sessions sometimes, especially for the steeplechase workouts where I can get an opportunity to practise my barrier jumps while running intervals. It is difficult to train for the 3,000m steeplechase entirely on one’s own, especially when one needs to practise barrier jumps while running intervals. I cannot move the heavy barriers singlehandedly. When the barriers are of the wrong height, I also cannot adjust the height of the barriers on my own. Even if I do those intervals with hurdles instead of barriers, it takes quite a bit of effort to move the hurdles on my own. So I’m thankful that coach Elangovan has allowed me to join his group for those sessions. Coach Elangovan was Singapore top distance runner for some years and had even represented Singapore in the 3,000m steeplechase at the SEA Games. Having had experience in the same event I do, he has, as the proverbial saying goes, been there and done that and I can trust his advice.

In the last month, Ms Tan Chew Peng, one of my earliest coaches, who oversaw my development in secondary school, offered to help with my preparations in this last stretch of training knowing that I have been coaching myself most of the time. So, she’s devising workouts for me and giving me feedback with regard to my training. I trust her because, when I was still in secondary school with no achievements to my name, she agreed to coach me at the recommendation of a friend who was a physical education (PE) teacher in my school, which did not have a formal track and field team then. I had approached the various PE teachers in school asking if there was any way they could help me as I had made up my mind to develop myself as a distance runner. Ms Tan is a coach who is passionate about track and field and in the development of the individual as a person, not merely an athlete.

I also trained under Mr Steven Quek for a period in university. I learnt the importance of discipline as an athlete under him: how to manage time as a student and an athlete, diet, recovery, and so on. In junior college, I trained under Mr Lawrence Ang. My first coach, whom I have unfortunately lost touch with, was Mr Kelvin Quek, a contract PE teacher at my secondary school. He was a teacher who was passionate about track and field and decided to start a group of runners who would train under him. I had no concept of training at the time and he was the one who introduced track and field to me. He showed us clips of Steve Prefontaine, a legendary American distance runner who was inspirational to my then 14-year-old self. Without Mr Kelvin Quek, I might not have found my way into the sport.

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

I keep general guidelines to my diet. I think about my food in terms of the groups they come in: carbohydrates, protein, vitamins, etc. So I make sure to have a good intake of carbohydrates, especially before training sessions, so I have sufficient fuel stores to perform well in training. After training sessions, protein is important for muscle repair so I try to get good protein into my body too whether it is from red meats or from protein shakes. I try to cut out oil and fried foods as much as possible because, as a distance runner, it is important to stay lean. I like drinking beetroot juice a few times a week too because, according to academic studies, it acts as a vasodilator thus allowing for increased blood flow and oxygenation of muscles for increased athletic performance.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

I enjoy reading, whether current affairs, fiction, or non-fiction. Telling stories interest me too and I do that through writing. I like sports and being active in general.

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

I train six to seven days a week, between nine and 12 sessions. Per week, I do two or three track interval sessions. Of these interval sessions, I try to have one of them done with hurdles or barriers. One long run at 20km or more. The other runs are easy or tempo runs up to 15km. One gym session a week.

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

I see my athletic future on the roads, in the half marathon and the marathon. I enjoy the half marathon a lot and it is probably my favourite event. Having clocked a 1 hour 14 minutes 52 seconds personal best last year in Incheon, South Korea, my aim would be to work towards a sub-1:10 in the future. Hopefully, that would set a platform for me to run a marathon in the 2:40s and 2:30s. I feel I haven’t fully tapped my potential in the marathon yet with a 2:56 in 2012 the best I have run so far.

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

Always find a reason to enjoy the sport. The reason(s) will differ for different people and won’t always be the same even for oneself but, if you always have one, it will form the cornerstone for you to find some measure of success in the sport. When you enjoy it, then you will want to run more and/or harder, which will then help you to improve as a runner. Distance running is about consistency of effort. It’s easy to lose motivation over such long stretches of time. But it’s no use training hard just for a week or a month. You have to do it over a sustained period of months and years and, so, it is important to keep in perspective what you enjoy about the sport and never lose sight of it. Also, and importantly, distance running is a sport that generally rewards what you put into it. So, while it’s nice to read about the sport and the latest shoes and gadgets, the most important thing is still to get out there and put in the hardwork. There is no replacement and shortcut for that.

Posted by Sha

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Raviin-so-Muthu-Kumar-DP

Name: Raviin S/O Muthu Kumar

Height: 1.71m

Weight: 53kg

Date of Birth: 22 November 1990 (25yrs)

Personal Best(s): 4:01.70min (Men 1500m, 2015 S’pore Open)

Career Highlight(s):

    Singapore Open 15, Bronze Medalist 1500m

    Swift Cross Country 15, 5km, Individual and Team Gold

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

It is to definitely do my best and achieve a remarkable PB. Not forgetting to give my competitors a good fight and the audience an awesome show.

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

Currently everything is going great, just putting more effort in keeping fit and not getting injured.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

Partially I would say sacrificing a lot of my social life for running, but the worst would be recovering from injuries as everything you worked hard for was wasted.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

1500m, I always believed that it’s the epitome of track running. It does tax your body in both the aerobic and anaerobic system thus training for it is not easy as you have to clock the miles and also run laps till you are overwhelmed in lactic. It’s a great challenge and I believe all runners should try 1500m at least once!

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

My current coach is Mr G. Elangovan, an extraordinary man who is very knowledgeable in the events that most of his athletes do like 800m to marathon. Instead of calling him a coach, I should call him my 2nd Father on track. He does what every dad would do, he pushes us till we are exhausted, then he explains to us why he did so, he protects from insecurities by always encouraging us. All I can say is that I believe in my coach and what he has planned for us.

My previous coach was Mr S. Pandian, a great man who introduced me to the reins of running. Though he believed in old school methods many of his athletes and I can vouch for the fact that his training not only improved out timings but also made us stronger people in life. There is a saying that goes “If you can tahan Pandian’s training, you deserve a salute”.

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

I don’t really watch what I eat but I believe that you have to watch when you eat your meals. Recently I am taking Maxi Nutrition Recovery Max cause I personally hate to eat after a hard run or workout(which is not right) thus drinking some recovery drinks after those sessions helps me recover what I lost. What we normally eat a day should cover the loss of nutrients thus supplements are not really necessary unless due to personally restrictions or for convenience sake.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

I love playing video games, watching movies, DISTURBING MY FRIENDS, playing badminton and of course reading books on psychology!

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

My family is really understanding but they do nag at me for coming home late because I was most probably doing the things mentioned above. Nevertheless I believe that studying and running complement each other. As when I am stressed from running I focus on my books and vice versa.

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

I train about 14 times a week, which means nearly twice every day. Training is usually broken down to event specific training, strength training and finally long runs. So we pretty much do the 3 types of training all week.

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

My long term goal is to represent Singapore in the Olympics!

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

To athletes from all sports, just go out there and try your best. Believe in yourself and at the end of the day leave it all out there with no regrets.

Posted by Sha

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Awyong-Liang-Qi-DP

Name: Awyong Liang Qi

Height: 1.75m

Weight: 67kg

Date of Birth: 13 January 1995 (20yrs)

Personal Best(s): 14.96s 3.5m/s & 15.02s 0.9m/s (Men 110mH)

Career Highlight(s): –

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

I hope to achieve a timing of 14.6 sec or better this time round. My current personal best is at 14.96s. Apart from that, I would also like to meet and interact with other athletes from all over the world.

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

Recently, I have been doing more training to work on my power and also conditioning work, as well as improving on my hurdling technique. Hopefully my efforts will pay off during the SEA Games.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

Before my graduation from Singapore Polytechnic, one of my challenges was to juggle between my trainings, my studies and spending time with my family and friends. Sometimes I feel envious of my friends who have more time to study or to hang out with their friends and family.

As the SEA games approaches, I see the need to prioritise my trainings over my other commitments and focus on achieving the goals that I have set.

For my athletics career in the future, a lot of it will depend on my condition after my national service and whether I am able to pick up from where I left off.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

I started hurdling since Primary Three. There was one training session when my coach set up a few hurdles and asked the team for volunteers to try clearing them.
So, I decided to give it a go and in the end my coach selected me to be a hurdler. Hurdling was not my only individual event back then; i ran the 100m sprint too.

However, i did not perform as well in the 100m as compared to the hurdling event, where i could at least make it to finals. There are two main parts to hurdling: clearing the hurdles and sprinting. For people like me who cannot sprint as fast as other pure sprinters, i can work on my technique such that I will be able to clear the hurdles faster than my competitors to make up for my slower sprinting speed between hurdles.

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

My current coach is Mr John Seem. He is a very technical coach, which is why i feel that my technique has improved under his coaching. He has been trying to correct some of my bad hurdling habits. However, I can be quite inconsistent and tend to default back to the hurdling technique that I have been doing in the past. I am still working hard to follow the advice from my coach and improve further. I am thankful for his guidance because without it, i would not have been able to make it into the SEA games squad.

My previous coach was Coach Slava back when i was in training in Singapore Sports School. As puberty hit me late (when I was in Secondary 4), i did not compete in as many major competitions as my teammates. However, he did not give up on me and still continued to train and motivate me. During meetings with my parents, he will always say the same thing: “Liang Qi is very good; it’s just that he needs to grow taller”. I have since grown taller and feel that all the training I put in back then paid off.

My Primary coach was Mr Serjit Singh aka Mr Bone. He was quite well known back then because of his whistle, which you could hear from the 100m starting line all the way to the finishing line. I am extremely thankful to have trained under him, as he was the one who introduced hurdling to me. Without him, i would probably have been still stuck in the Choir. Also, he was the one who asked me to go for the Sports School Open House and personally introduced me to Coach Slava. So, it was because of him that i found out about the Sports School and enrolled in it! That was where I met a lot of awesome staff and friends that i still keep in contact with today. I do not think i would have continued hurdling if I had not made it to Sports School. It saddens me to not be able to thank him personally as I have lost contact with him. I do hope that he will read and see my message for him.

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

I do not really have a very strict nutrition and diet plan. I try to eat clean as much as possible and avoid eating junk food. I used to take supplements to aid in my growth so I have no objections to taking supplements. In fact, they can help in muscle recovery after trainings so i would not mind taking them.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

I would love to try out other sports like gymnastics, diving and martial arts. I love singing as well, even though I think I sound worse now after breaking my voice. I also love eating! I would love travel around to explore and find great food.

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

It is very challenging to fit training with my family and studies. I train every evening except for Sunday, so it is sometimes very difficult to spend time with my family. However, I try my best to find time to be with them. For example, my mother takes time off on Mondays, so I usually keep my Mondays free to spend time with her during the holidays. I always feel jealous of my friends who can work during the holidays. As much as I wish to take up a part-time job, i cannot find a suitable one that accommodates my training schedule.

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

I train 3x technical training, 4x gym sessions per week.

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

I hope that after my National Service, I’ll be able to resume training properly and return back to my current performance. Of course, I would certainly want to compete in SEA games again, if possible.

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

Never give up despite meeting with failure. The training that you have put in now will definitely benefit you in the future. So keep working hard and chase your dreams! Also, reach for the skies, for even if you fail, you will fall on the stars.

Posted by Sha

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Jannah-Wong-Min-DP

Name: Jannah Wong Min

Height: 1.70m

Weight: 59kg

Date of Birth: 9 August 1996 (19yrs)

Personal Best(s): 14.14s (Women 100mH, 2014 Asian Junior C’ships)

Career Highlight(s):

    National Record Holder for 100m Hurdles

    Joint National Junior Record Holder for 4x100m

    100m Hurdles

    Bronze Medalist at Asian Junior Championships 2014

    Qualified for IAAF World Juniors 2014

    4th at 8th SEA Youth 2013

    Qualified for IAAF World Youth 2013

    Gold Medalist at 7th SEA Youth 2012

    5th at Asian Junior Championships 2012

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

To better my PB timing.

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

Training last month has been hampered due to a strained hamstring sustained during the 4×100 relay race at the Sydney Open in March. Recovering well and is training diligently to prepare for the SEA Games.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

Injuries and balancing studies. Injuries causing interruptions in training and not being able to compete can be both frustrating and upsetting; e.g. the Singapore Open held last month.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

Not sure what’s the attraction but I suppose it’s a gift and an event that I truly enjoy.

I started participating in Inter-School National Primary meet when I was in P3 competing in Long Jump and High Jump. Mr Lim, my primary school coach who saw a potential in me doing hurdles decided to switch my high jump event to hurdles when I was in P6. That decision was proven right when I broke the school record for the 80m hurdles that year.

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

My current coach is Mr Melvin Tan. He helped me balance my studies and training when I was in Raffles JC, especially during the times when I had an exam and a major competition at the same time. He is not only a coach but also a friend that we can talk to and even joke around with. He is very dedicated in training his athletes too.

The late Mr Lim Tiang Quee was the root of my running career. He was my coach during my primary and secondary school days. I learned a lot from him during my 8 years with him; and apart from training, he always emphasized on the importance of good character development. Mr Lim always has high hopes of me breaking the National Record (which I did last year at the Asian Junior, just 2 days before he left us) and qualifying for major competition like coming SEA Games. And Mr Linus Lee who helped Mr Lim during his training sessions.

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

My mum takes cares of my nutrition and diet. A well-balanced diet is important. Supplement is intended to provide nutrients that may otherwise not be consumed in sufficient quantities.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

Nil.

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

During my school days, balancing between training/competition with studies is a challenge. But knowing your priority and what you wished to achieved can help you with this challenge. Dinner with family at least once a week is a routine set.

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

I had about 3 weeks of conditioning and now, it focuses on preparing for my hurdles event. It consists of about 2-3 sessions of hurdles, 1-2 strength and core session, 1-2 endurance session and 1 active recovery session.

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

To be able to continue competing for my country and doing her proud.

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

Enjoy what you are pursuing and work towards achieving your goals with determination and building good character.

Winning feels good, but our character on and off track reflects who we really are.

Champions are not defined by their scores, but by their character.

Posted by Sha

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Joy-Kuan-Hui-Min-DP

Name: Joy Kuan Hui Min

Height: 1.68m

Weight: 51kg

Date of Birth: 23 October 1991 (24yrs)

Personal Best(s): 58.76s (Women 400m, 2015 Malaysia Open)

Career Highlight(s): 400m Finalist at the recent 2015 Malaysia Open and 2015 Singapore Open.

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

For the 4x400m relay team to hold a new record.

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

My training preparations are going well currently.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

Firstly, it is trying to strike a balance between training, work, leisure and rest. Sometimes I feel so exhausted that I’d fall asleep at work. Secondly, it is battling with injuries that will really hinder your progression and performance.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

It was the foresight of my coach. Last July my coach told me to give 400m a try and it was his confidence in me that made me take that first step. The attraction is how I can overcome the pain each time I compete.

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

My current coach is Kamarulzaman bin Tahir. His dedication and commitment towards coaching us is very admirable and he puts our well-being before his. He has nothing but positive and encouraging words for us all the time. Without him, I wouldn’t be where I am today.

My previous coaches were Coach Tan Wei Leong and Coach Edmund Yeo when I was in SIM.

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

I do avoid fried food and try to cut down on desserts. I don’t have a strict diet but I try to add more carbs and protein in my meals. I believe that certain supplements do help in recovery to a certain extent.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

I love travelling.

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

I’m very grateful to my current employer who allows me to have a 3-days work week. I usually spend more time with my family over the weekends.

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

Usually 4-5 times of track work per week, with 2 times of gym session/plyo/core.

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

To qualify and represent Singapore at other Major games.

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

You’ll never know what you can achieve unless you dare to try it. Positivity is key!

Posted by Sha

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Lance-Tan-Wei-Sheng-DP

Name: Lance Tan Wei Sheng

Height: 1.78m

Weight: 71kg

Date of Birth: 14 May 1987 (28yrs)

Personal Best(s): 4761 points (Decathlon Men, 2015 Malaysia Open)

Career Highlight(s):

    South East Asian Games bronze medalist 4x400m 2011

    ASEAN University Games bronze medalist 4x100m 2010

    Singapore National Games champion 400m 2012

    Vietnam Open bronze medalist 400m 2009

    National Schools champion 400m 2005

    Represented Singapore at World Junior Championships 2006

    Represented Singapore at Commonwealth Youth Games 2004

    4x100m National Junior Record Holder

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

I am thrilled and extremely excited to be participating at our home SEA Games. I do believe I will be able to hit my personal bests and put up a good fight!

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

Preparations have been okay but not great due to injuries and work commitments. Nonetheless, I will still give it 100% at trainings.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

I tore my left knee anterior cruciate ligament back in 2007 and underwent reconstruction surgery. Then, the doctors told me to give up competitive running- to quit. But how could I? Athletics is my passion, and I still wanted to achieve so many things.

I guess that was the hardest road back, but 9 months after the surgery, I came back stronger, clocking my then personal bests in the 400m and 200m.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

I used to specialize in the 400m. I love the 400m because it is a fast sprint, yet long enough for strategy and tactics to be played out. This SEA Games however, I will be participating in the decathlon. People have asked why I switched events- I told them that I just added 9 more. I love athletics, so why not try them all!

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

Coach legend Mr Patrick “Santa Claus” Zhender started me off when I was 13. I switched schools when I was 15 and was coached by Mr Tan Chong Kiat.

Mr Melvin Tan Kim Boon took over when I entered Junior College and then, University. Mr Melvin Tan is still my mentor today, and while I plan my own track workouts for the decathlon, I do take a leaf out of his book from the years of trainings I’ve had under his guidance.

Currently, Mr Tan Yong Sheng and Mr Ng Kiat Mun trains and advises me on the decathlon and pole vault respectively. Being new to this discipline, I do seek the help of fellow athletes for tips as well!

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

In general, I don’t watch my food intake strictly, but I do avoid taking fried or oily food. I’ll recommend multivitamins as a daily diet as it will keep the body healthy and immunity up.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

I like baseball and cycling as well. Outside of sports and work, I like photography and spending quality time with loved ones.

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

I guess it is just a lifestyle. Compartmentalize your tasks and just get it done.

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

The best part of training for the decathlon is that there will be something different to do at each training. Most sessions, however, will incorporate speed work/ hurdles, followed by throws/ strength and finally speed endurance.

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

I do hope I’ll be able to continue learning about the sport and perhaps venture into coaching someday.

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

Have faith, and trust your trainings.

Posted by Sha

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Lynette-Goh-Hui-Yu-DP

Name: Lynette Goh Hui Yu

Height: 1.62m

Weight: 50kg

Date of Birth: 5 February 1995 (20yrs)

Personal Best(s): 12.51s (Women 100m, 2013 National School)

Career Highlight(s):

    Gold Medal for 100m and 200m for A division nationals schools (2013)

    5th placing in SEA Youth in 100m (2011)

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

I don’t think people would say I have high hopes for this SEA Games, but what I’m hoping is that I would have the opportunity to run in the 4x100m this SEA Games, and I hope that the team will have very smooth passing and manage to get a medal.

However, if I don’t, I wish the same for the rest of my teammates. And my target would be to be a reliable reserve in the relay team where the coaches and my teammates can count on me that I would still give my best during the trainings/warm ups etc.

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

Aside from the additional centralised relay trainings, trainings has been pretty much the same as before.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

Injuries, and sometimes I don’t think I have enough confidence.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

I’m not very sure how I came to specialise in it, but I like the 100m because it’s very very fast paced, and you barely have the time to think during the race, you just go.

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

Mr Pedro Acuna is my coach. I respect him a lot and I think he’s a super great coach. He also cares a lot about his athletes, and is very knowledgeable.

My other coaches were Mr Lin, Mr Nigel and Coach Margaret.

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

I love food, so usually I just eat whatever I want, as long as I get 3 or more meals a day. Usually nearing competitions I would take extra care as to what I eat then.

I think supplements can sometimes help to give your body the extra nutrients it needs, and to also keep ones immune system strong so that we don’t fall sick that easily.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

Food, Traveling, Recreational sports.

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

I usually have dinners with my family.

I try to pay real good attention in class to cut my studying time. Though sometimes I have to bring myself to study when I get back home and sometimes I study on the bus.

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

Among the 7 training sessions, usually 2 are gym sessions and the rest are track sessions

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

I think it would be to get better timings gradually, and then getting the opportunity to represent Singapore in more competitions.

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

Find what you really enjoy, and stick with it. Persevere whenever you come across any obstacles because they’re inevitable. But they will make you stronger as an athlete as well as as a person. Also, this will help you when you face more of them in the future.

Posted by Sha

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Carmel-Teo-DP

Name: Carmel Teo

Height: 1.64m

Weight: 52kg

Date of Birth: 1 December 1996 (19yrs)

Personal Best(s): 3.45m (Women pole vault, 2014 Asian Junior)

Career Highlight(s): Women national junior pole vault record holder.

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

I hope to break my own personal best as well as win a bronze medal in my event.

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

It’s fine.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

Breaking my left shin in 2012.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

My CCA teacher-in-charge asked if I wanted it give it a try when I was in secondary 3. Because this event is not like other events. It requires much more technique which is a lot more challenging. The feeling after successfully crossing a height cannot be easily replicated elsewhere.

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

Mr David Yeo. He is a great coach who takes great care of his athlete though he doesn’t really show it.

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

I try to eat less junk food recently due to the major influx of competitions however in my off seasons I usually just eat anything I want till I’m full.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

I enjoy playing most sports and travelling to new places when I can try new sports. I also love going to amusement parks.

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

I try to spend the weekends with my family as most of the times spent during weekdays are on school and training.

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

Now that I am waiting for school to start, I train every Mon-Fri. During school periods I train every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Most training is spent jumping unless it rains and then we will do PT.

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

Breaking the national record and go on the represent Singapore in more international competitions.

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

Train hard, train smart and remember to believe in yourself as well as your coach.

Posted by Sha

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Cheryl-Chan-Xue-Rou-DP

Name: Cheryl Chan Xue Rou

Height: 1.53m

Weight: 48kg

Date of Birth: 20 September 1995 (20yrs)

Personal Best(s): 4:55.86min (1500m Women, 2015 S’pore Open) and 11:55.50min (Women 3000mSC, 2015 Taiwan Open)

Career Highlight(s): –

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

I’m trying my best to get a medal for the 3000m Steeplechase, and also a Personal Best to clock a new National Record! :)

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

Training’s been insane! Clocking loads of mileage, practicing my barrier clearance, crashing, and rising from each painful landing to chase the clock.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

The Challenge is to be able to balance between pushing to the limits and not getting injured. Injuries are great roadblocks to every athletes’ journey to the Games, so it’s very important to know when to stop.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

I stumbled upon steeplechase by chance actually, when Coach jokingly asked me to try doing a lap with barriers. He was surprise to see me clear rather than crash and guess that led to my first race which was more of a scare than anything! But I’d say Steeplechase brings a little more fun to the many rounds on the track, and the water jump sure does gives a good shot of adrenaline which each clearance

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

Current Coach is Coach Elangovan. He’s really strict when it comes to training, which pushes us to give our best for every training. He also brings along his two really adorable daughters who are the team’s cutest cheerleaders.

My previous Coaches were my Cedar coaches: Mr Chris Chan, Mr Tay Yong Hwee and Mr Chue Weng Fai, whom I’ll be eternally grateful to. They were the ones who saw the Best in me and gave me the encouragement to be a school triple gold medalist from 2009-2012. I couldn’t have done it if it wasn’t for their endless support and believe in me.

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

Not very strictly, but I’m sacrificing my favourite Ice-cream on Waffles till after SEA Games!

I feel it’s important to eat healthy and abstain from greasy food to avoid feeling lethargy for trainings or races. Supplements on the other hand helps in the recovery for the next session.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

My greatest passion would be my love for animals, thus my Dream would be to fulfil my ambition to be a Vet. I currently love my job in the stables at the National Equestrian Centre where I work with and learn more about Horses.

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

I feel it’s all about Making time for your friends and family, and having the Discipline to complete schoolwork before they pile up. Training becomes like a distraction from distractions, so you really just focus on excelling in both Sports and Studies.

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

Per week:
Averaging 70-80k mileage
1x Speedwork
2x Event Specific Training
1x Weights

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

Currently not too sure if I’ll want to continue track, most likely gonna go back to Triathlon in Australia.

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

Grab each opportunity you have, and give it your very Best. You’ll never know when your next chance might be. Don’t let anything Stop you, Chase your Dreams and Don’t Stop till you’re there. Impossible is not a word, just a reason, for someone not to try.

Posted by Sha

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Michelle-Sng-Suat-Li-DP

Name: Michelle Sng Suat Li

Height: 1.75m

Weight: 64kg

Date of Birth: 19 May 1987 (28yrs)

Personal Best(s): 1.84m (Women high jump, 2015 Philippines Open)

Career Highlight(s):

    National record 1.84m
    National junior record 1.80m

Q) What are your hopes, dream and target this SEA Games?

I want to break the national record.

Q) How’s your preparation for the SEA Games?

I’m working on my full run up to ensure my consistency.

Q) What are some of the biggest challenges in your sports career so far leading to SEA Games and your athletics career?

I had stress fracture in my left shin in 2007 and underwent surgery in 2008. In 2010, I had to leave the sport because I was no longer clearing the heights I wanted.

Coming back in November 2013 was difficult both physically and psychologically, but I’m glad I did.

Q) How did you specialise in your particular event? Why this event, what’s the attraction?

I took part in high jump at my school’s sports day when I was 13 and realised that I wasn’t too bad at it.

I love the technicalities of high jump and how one has to defy gravity to do the sport. There is so much beauty in a well-executed leap.

Q) Who is your coach, tell us more about him/her. Also a mention of your previous coaches.

Since I was 14, I have been training with Ms Chan See Huey. She was a heptahlete and once held the national records for heptathlon, high jump and long jump.

Q) Do you take care of your nutrition and diet? Your opinion on supplements and food.

I’m a pescetarian so I have to make a special effort to ensure I have enough protein, be it through my daily meals or through supplements.

Q) Aside from athletics, what else interest you? You could say the other part of your life beyond athletics.

I love travelling. During my 3 year hiatus, I backpacked through 22 countries.

I’m also an avid yogi. Before I came back to the track, I would practice 50-60 classes a month.

Q) How do you fit in your training/competing with your family and studies/work?

I would say time management coupled with a lot of praying and hoping that my leave gets approved.

Q) Share with the readers, some aspects of your training regime.

2x gym
2x technique
2-3x plyo and sprints
1-2x yoga/Pilates

Q) What are your long term athletics goals?

I’d like to be able to call myself a 190 jumper.

Q) What advice do you have for young aspiring athletes?

Stay hungry. Stay humble.

singapore athletic association

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SA
Founded in 1934, SA's historic footprints began more than 60 years ago when we opened our doors to Singapore's early athletes at the Farrer Park Stadium. Since then, the SA has toiled and grown, and is now poised to chart new territories for the future. Under the helm of a new dynamic team of volunteers and full-time secretariat, the association will take bold strides to nurture talents and work towards a holistic athlete development and making competitive athletics a viable career, read more »
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Singapore Athletics (#01-33, 3 Stadium Drive, S'pore 397630) Tel: 6563862721 / Fax: 6563867773 / UEN: S63SS0015L
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